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About the Center

With economics permeating so much of public policy, this center's reach is quite extensive.

With economics permeating so much of public policy, this center's reach is quite extensive.

Illustrating this trend, we published a variety of policy proposals in our latest publication, "10 Ideas for Economic Development." Our locally-oriented pieces included such ideas as combating homelessness, public transportation in New York, promoting community banks in under-banked markets, and providing incentives young professional to work in  Vermont.  Our national pieces discussed fair value accounting, a sovereign wealth fund for the U.S., ending agricultural subsidies, the federal tax credit for research and development, and the need for an Islamic banking system in the U.S. Finally, we published one internationally-focused piece on using effective commodity tracking to reduce violence in the DRC.

This year, we will have three primary areas of focus. First, we will research financial regulation, with a particular focus on the student lending market. While financial regulatory reform can be a particularly nebulous concept, all students have a vested interest in seeing a new era of accountability and sustainability in the financial industry. Moreover, all students can relate to the problems in the student loan industry. Next, we will discuss the labor market, relevant unemployment programs, and how the stimulus is addressing this critical issue. This issue is especially salient for students, as, after all, unemployment for young people is roughly twice as high as the national average and the job market for recent graduates is among the worst in history. Finally, the Economic Development center will focus on community development, specifically through entrepreneurship and micro-lending. Young people, and especially college students, have the talent and ideas needed to improve their communities; all they need is an opportunity from local policy makers and the corresponding regulatory space.